F A S C I N A T I N G Development involves mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels to arrive at the complex anatomical and physiological structure of an organism. The study of development can shed light into the processes of many diseases that afflict people worldwide.
Reblogged from sciencesourceimages  76 notes

sciencesourceimages:

I’ve Got Rocks In My Head…

…and so do all of you. The image at the top is a colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of crystals of calcium carbonate on the surface of an otolith. They are the “balancing stones” of the inner ear and are found in our Acoustic Macula.

See more images of the Acoustic Macula

The acoustic macula is responsible for our static equilibrium (position of the head) and participates in dynamic equilibrium (recognition of the linear accelerations). Located at the level of the inner ear, the macula is composed of hair cells (in orange), constituting the sensorial receptors, and of supporting cells (in pink). Each hair cell possesses between 40 to 70 stereocilia and a single kinocilium.

See SEMs of Inner Ear Hair Cells

The supporting cells secrete a gelatinous substance forming the otolithic membrane, in which embed the stereocilia and kinocilia. This membrane is covered with a layer of those calcium carbonate crystals (shown at top). Each hair cell forms a synapse with a sensitive neuron (in yellow) and a motor neuron (in green) of the vestibular branch of the auditory nerve.

See more images of the Inner Ear

During a sharp acceleration leading the head forward (during the ascension in the roller coaster, for example), the inertia causes a sliding movement backwards of the otolithic membrane and the otoliths, that move the stereocilia and kinocilia with them. This leads to a stimulation of the vestibular nerve, enabling the recognition of the movement. 

What would a trip to an amusement park be without your inner ear?!

All images © Science Source 

Weblike sheath covering developing egg chambers in a giant grasshopper
Kevin Edwards, Johny Shajahan and Doug Whitman, Illinois State University
The lubber grasshopper, found throughout the southern United States, is frequently used in biology classes to teach students about the respiratory system of insects. Unlike mammals, which have red blood cells that carry oxygen throughout the body, insects have breathing tubes that carry air through their exoskeleton directly to where it’s needed. This image shows the breathing tubes embedded in the weblike sheath cells that cover developing egg chambers.
Found on National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Weblike sheath covering developing egg chambers in a giant grasshopper

Kevin Edwards, Johny Shajahan and Doug Whitman, Illinois State University

The lubber grasshopper, found throughout the southern United States, is frequently used in biology classes to teach students about the respiratory system of insects. Unlike mammals, which have red blood cells that carry oxygen throughout the body, insects have breathing tubes that carry air through their exoskeleton directly to where it’s needed. This image shows the breathing tubes embedded in the weblike sheath cells that cover developing egg chambers.

Found on National Institute of General Medical Sciences

‘Shape-shifting’ material could help reconstruct faces
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 13, 2014 — Injuries, birth defects (such as cleft palates) or surgery to remove a tumor can create gaps in bone that are too large to heal naturally. And when they occur in the head, face or jaw, these bone defects can dramatically alter a person’s appearance. Researchers will report today that they have developed a “self-fitting” material that expands with warm salt water to precisely fill bone defects, and also acts as a scaffold for new bone growth.
Read More: American Chemical Society

‘Shape-shifting’ material could help reconstruct faces

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 13, 2014 — Injuries, birth defects (such as cleft palates) or surgery to remove a tumor can create gaps in bone that are too large to heal naturally. And when they occur in the head, face or jaw, these bone defects can dramatically alter a person’s appearance. Researchers will report today that they have developed a “self-fitting” material that expands with warm salt water to precisely fill bone defects, and also acts as a scaffold for new bone growth.

Read More: American Chemical Society

Christmas in August
Nikon winner Donna Stolz is ready for Christmas — on a microscopic level, at least. This is a collage of mammalian cells, stained to reveal various proteins and organelles and then assembled into a wreath. 
Found on livescience.

Christmas in August

Nikon winner Donna Stolz is ready for Christmas — on a microscopic level, at least. This is a collage of mammalian cells, stained to reveal various proteins and organelles and then assembled into a wreath. 

Found on livescience.

The ovaries of a fruit fly contain multiple ovarioles, biological assembly lines in which egg chambers develop into fly eggs. “Fruit Fly Factory” shows the cross-sections of 10 ovarioles from different fruit flies - arranged with stem cells and early-stage egg chambers at the center, and the more mature chambers at the periphery. The photomicrograph, which was selected as the “People’s Choice” by visitors to the Art of Science exhibit, was entered by graduate students Yogesh Goyal and Bomyi Lim, postdoc Miriam Osterfield and engineering professor Stas Shvartsman.
Y. Goyal / B. Lim / M. Osterfield / S. Shvartsman / Princeton Art of Science
Check out Princeton University’s Art of Science  Exhibition

The ovaries of a fruit fly contain multiple ovarioles, biological assembly lines in which egg chambers develop into fly eggs. “Fruit Fly Factory” shows the cross-sections of 10 ovarioles from different fruit flies - arranged with stem cells and early-stage egg chambers at the center, and the more mature chambers at the periphery. The photomicrograph, which was selected as the “People’s Choice” by visitors to the Art of Science exhibit, was entered by graduate students Yogesh Goyal and Bomyi Lim, postdoc Miriam Osterfield and engineering professor Stas Shvartsman.

Y. Goyal / B. Lim / M. Osterfield / S. Shvartsman / Princeton Art of Science

Check out Princeton University’s Art of Science  Exhibition

Reblogged from nysci  74 notes
nysci:

Placental Vasculature of a transgenic mouse embryo.
Want to see more beautiful and significant life science images, captured through a light microscope? Then visit our Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition Exhibit. #Microscope #Science (at New York Hall of Science)

nysci:

Placental Vasculature of a transgenic mouse embryo.

Want to see more beautiful and significant life science images, captured through a light microscope? Then visit our Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition Exhibit.
#Microscope #Science (at New York Hall of Science)

Reblogged from gay-parabola  25 notes
maihudson:

Wim Delvoye's Cloaca Original (2000)
Cloaca is a large installation that turns food into feces, allowing Delvoye to explore the digestive process. The food begins at a long, transparent mouth, travels through a number of machine-like assembly stations, and ends in hard matter which is separated from liquid through a cylinder. Delvoye collects and sells the realistically smelling output, suspended in small jars of resin at his Ghent studio. When asked about his inspiration, Delvoye stated that everything in modern life is pointless. The most useless object he could create was a machine that serves no purpose at all, besides the reduction of food to waste. (wiki)

maihudson:

Wim Delvoye's Cloaca Original (2000)

Cloaca is a large installation that turns food into feces, allowing Delvoye to explore the digestive process. The food begins at a long, transparent mouth, travels through a number of machine-like assembly stations, and ends in hard matter which is separated from liquid through a cylinder. Delvoye collects and sells the realistically smelling output, suspended in small jars of resin at his Ghent studio. When asked about his inspiration, Delvoye stated that everything in modern life is pointless. The most useless object he could create was a machine that serves no purpose at all, besides the reduction of food to waste. (wiki)

Baby-shaped pears grow from trees in china

With the help of fruitmold‘s plastic products, pears shaped like babies are growing from trees on farms in china and being sold at supermarkets in neighboring areas. with peaceful closed eyes, miniscule nose and mouth and daintily crossed hands, the infantile forms look oddly realistic. during the fruit’s developmental stages, the farmers apply a frame around the budding pear, which it eventually grows into and realizes its shape. in addition to selling the quirky harvests in nearby markets, the suzhou-based company ships their plastic devices across the globe, so baby-shaped pears — and other produce — can be grown all over the world.

All images courtesy of fruitmold

Source: designboom